Tag Archives: people

Unfurling HR – conversations for change

koruLast week I attended the Unfurling HR Unconference organised and facilitated by Amanda Sterling of NZLead. The fern was used as a metaphor for unfurling, unravelling and re-positioning the people and culture related disciplines in organisations. It was an inspiring and motivational event and I have included links to other blogs with feedback about the unconference below.

I participated in discussions about leadership, personal development and the internal brand. As a consultant I couldn’t resist putting my feedback into a stop-start-continue format with suggestions for organisations and HR.

  Organisations could…. HR could….
Stop
  • Leaving all the people stuff to HR
  • Leaving all the compliance stuff to HR
  • Creating a consumer brand disconnected from the employee experience
  • Tolerating poor people management practice
  • Taking on all the people stuff
  • Taking on all the compliance stuff
  • Creating employment brands
  • Tolerating poor people management practice
Start
  • Ensuring all managers are trained how to manage people
  • Supporting personal development for all staff from day one
  • Supporting a culture that is living the brand inside as well as outside
  • Developing leadership across the board
  •  Facilitating processes to ensure all managers are well trained
  • Facilitating personal development plans for all
  • Collaborating with marketing and others to develop the culture that supports the brand
  • Identifying leadership qualities that support the culture
Continue
  • To look for better ways to do things
  • To collaborate with HR to create stronger organisations
  • To recognise the knowledge and experience of their people related teams

 

  • Having challenging conversations about doing things better
  • To learn about the business and how they can best add value
  • To learn from each other and share knowledge widely in their organisations

Thoughts from other attendees- #unfurlingHR created a lot of food for thought.

Amanda Sterling – Reflections from #unfurlingHR – what next

Megan Borrie – #unfurlingHR – Baking these things in

Richard Westney – Off the beaten Track

Angela Atkins – #UnfurlingHR

Vaughan Rivett – Attending my first unconference

Jonathan Hagger – One quick recap

PS- this event will inspire at least one more blog from me,  so watch this space.

He tāngata, he tāngata, he tāngata

It is people, it is people, it is people….

2013-12-13 10.17.16

Recently I changed the banner photo on my site to one of the flax at my place. Mainly because I like the photo and I wanted to use something that was personal to me, rather than the stock photos I have been using. As a New Zealander, I love our flax , or Harakeke, and can’t think of a better image to represent our environment.

I am aware of the reverence given to the harakeke by Maori, so did a bit of research about  its significance and came across this wonderful proverb.

A Harakeke Proverb

Hutia te rito o te harakeke,
Kei whea te kōmako e kō?
Kī mai ki ahau;
He aha te mea nui o te Ao?
Māku e kī atu,
he tāngata, he tāngata, he tāngata

If the heart of the harakeke was removed, where will the bellbird sing?  If I was asked what was the most important thing in the world;   I would be compelled to reply, It is people, it is people, it is people. 

Therefore, not only is my photo of flax the perfect representation of NZ, it is a great representation of  organisational development, which is about people first and foremost.

We should treat our organisations with reverence and respect, understanding that we need to nurture and encourage the new shoots in order to secure the future.  Taking care of people by providing structure, guidance, learning, encouragement, reward, celebration and communication; will build strong and resilient organisations that will endure well into the future.

How often do you see organisations that  don’t reach their potential, or worse, wither and die, because they are not treated with the respect they and their people deserve?

I would like to see a world where our organisations, whether business, not for profit, private or public; are treated with respect by the people who have responsibility for them. Invest time, thought, care and attention to create an organisation that will endure.

There is nothing more to say except,  he tāngata, he tāngata, he tāngata. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What makes a strong organisation?

In recent years there has been much written, and spoken, about resilient organisations. What does being resilient mean? One definition is to withstand shock without permanent deformation or rupture. Another is to recover from, or adjust easily to , misfortune or change.  

What makes an organisation strong and therefore resilient to outside forces?

My answer is “the people”

There are a few steps you can take to build strong organisations- I have listed a few that I think can be easily implemented in any organisation.

  • Recruit well: Select people for attitude and build the skills they need to do the job well
  • Train well: From day one, have an orientation programme that helps your new recruit to understand the culture and become part of the organisation quickly. Have a range of training options to continually up skill your staff member (ie one-on-one “buddy” system, mentoring/coaching, formal study programmes etc)
  • Communicate well: tell people stuff! Involve your staff in what is going on, good and bad. Involve them in solutions, trust them with information. Have conversations about your organisation, the industry, the economy- what ever is going to affect you.
  • Empower: Delegate authority to the level it needs to be. Not everything needs to be held by the management team. Your life, your staff’s working life, the customer experience; will be much better if your staff are empowered to make decisions.
  • Reward: Pay as much as you can for the skills, experience and attitude your staff member brings to the job. However, reward is not just about money- shout morning tea, send a thank you email, take someone to coffee, say thank-you, tell someone they have done a good job- simple things that will make a difference.
  • Systemise: Develop systems that support the jobs that need to be done and the people doing them. Take out the hassle, the bureaucracy, the unnecessary steps and create more efficiency.
  • Continuously improve: develop a culture of continuous improvement, of looking for a better way and challenging the status quo. Have the conversations that matter to your organisation.

A strong and resilient organisation will withstand outside pressure and get better and better- and you will have a team who can help build it.